A debate on the areas where overturns can occur to restore planetary equilibrium.

Action on environmental problems has lagged so far behind that only a rapid and radical shift in a positive direction could change the pace of things.

Although the real possibilities of a sudden and coordinated turnaround may seem slim, scientists point out that major social changes are not linear, and that specific actions or changes in attitudes can have a tremendous multiplier potential.

These changes would expand, in the same way as an oil slick, a transforming action that would allow us to break out of the linear processes of environmental deterioration and would lead us, irreversibly, to a new stable state for the planet.

Where might  these windows of opportunity or social tipping points capable of precipitating such large-scale changes open up?  Let's look at cities, the food system, energy, education, and others, in search of turning points to save the planet.

Caty Arévalo

Caty Arévalo is a journalist and communicator expert in environment. For almost two decades she has covered the main events in this field at national and international level as environmental correspondent of the EFE Agency. In parallel, she has been a researcher and author of publications on climate change communication at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where she was part of the Knight Science Journalism program in the 2013/14 academic year, and at the Reuters Institute of the University of Oxford. Her career in communication and dissemination of knowledge of environmental issues has been recognized, among others, with the BBVA Foundation Award for Biodiversity Conservation. rom 2018 to 2021 she led the communication of the Ministry for Ecological Transition, from where she contributed to promote the social debate on the need to move towards a new development model. She is currently an advisor to the Presidency of the Senate of Spain.

A debate on the areas where overturns can occur to restore planetary equilibrium.

Action on environmental problems has lagged so far behind that only a rapid and radical shift in a positive direction could change the pace of things.

Although the real possibilities of a sudden and coordinated turnaround may seem slim, scientists point out that major social changes are not linear, and that specific actions or changes in attitudes can have a tremendous multiplier potential.

These changes would expand, in the same way as an oil slick, a transforming action that would allow us to break out of the linear processes of environmental deterioration and would lead us, irreversibly, to a new stable state for the planet.

Where might  these windows of opportunity or social tipping points capable of precipitating such large-scale changes open up?  Let's look at cities, the food system, energy, education, and others, in search of turning points to save the planet.


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