Following the results of COP26, how do we transform our eco-anxiety into climate action?

We are living through an historical moment at a global level that will be decisive for the quality of our survival as humans. The climate crisis not only affects the ecosystems on which we depend, but it also affects very directly our health and economy.

Governments have been negotiating measures for decades to limit global warming and thus reduce our impact on the climate crisis. However, the annual United Nations climate summits, known as "COP" by their official name, still do not meet the necessary objectives to curb the rise in temperature and its consequences.

Meanwhile, the number of people who suffer from "eco-anxiety" is increasing, the psychological impact that derives from uncertainty, impotence and chronic fear in the face of this situation. After the celebration of COP26, in which direction are we moving? And what tools do we have to transform this eco-anxiety into climate action?

Irene Baños Ruiz

Periodista y comunicadora especializada en temas de medioambiente y cambio climático

Irene Baños Ruiz is a multimedia communicator and journalist specialized in environmental and climate change issues. Since 2016, she has regularly collaborated with the environment department of Deutsche Welle (DW), Germany's international broadcaster. She has been in charge of covering four consecutive United Nations Climate Summits (COP23-COP26) for DW. In addition to that, since the beginning of 2021, she has promoted environmental journalism, access to information and freedom of expression in Latin America from the DW Akademie, the leading German organization in international cooperation for the media. She combines her work at DW with collaborations for other media and institutions. She is the author of the book "Ecoansias" (Ariel, 2020) and co-author of "Che cosa è la bioeconomia" (Edizioni Ambiente, 2019).

Following the results of COP26, how do we transform our eco-anxiety into climate action?

We are living through an historical moment at a global level that will be decisive for the quality of our survival as humans. The climate crisis not only affects the ecosystems on which we depend, but it also affects very directly our health and economy.

Governments have been negotiating measures for decades to limit global warming and thus reduce our impact on the climate crisis. However, the annual United Nations climate summits, known as "COP" by their official name, still do not meet the necessary objectives to curb the rise in temperature and its consequences.

Meanwhile, the number of people who suffer from "eco-anxiety" is increasing, the psychological impact that derives from uncertainty, impotence and chronic fear in the face of this situation. After the celebration of COP26, in which direction are we moving? And what tools do we have to transform this eco-anxiety into climate action?


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